Tag Archives: furnace

How Well Did Your Furnace Perform This Winter?

How Well Did Your Furnace Perform This Winter?By late winter, you’ve had time to judge your furnace performance and how it compares to previous years. It’s a good idea to monitor how well the furnace works to stay on top of its efficiency and safety.

Throughout the heating season, pay attention to:

Energy bills

The easiest way to judge how well your heat pump or furnace is running is to take a look at your gas and electric bills for the heating season. If they’re higher than the years before and the weather has been stable, you may have a performance issue. Over time, motors don’t blow as much air or the air filter is clogged. Generally, there’s a reason for rising energy costs that are unrelated to the weather.

Sounds

Gas heating systems make noise, some of which are normal. When you hear a clink or bang with a gas furnace, call your HVAC contractor. It could indicate a problem with the burner or heat exchanger, both of which could be serious.

Condensation

Windows that fog over when your furnace runs frequently indicate a system that needs professional attention immediately. Gas systems generate water vapor as a byproduct of burning gas.

If the furnace isn’t venting properly, the vapor will collect indoors. Besides humidity, it could contain carbon monoxide (CO) and other toxic gases. Shut it off and call Powers Heating & Air for assistance.

Rust and Soot

Just as window condensation is a bad sign, so is rust on the furnace’s parts. Look it over periodically for signs of rust around the burner, flue and housing.

Soot is never a good sign. It indicates that the equipment needs adjusting and cleaning to improve furnace performance.

Registers

Look over the registers periodically throughout your home to look for excessive amounts of dust on them or nearby. Dust or dirt deposits could indicate a ductwork leak, which makes your system work harder to heat your home and lowers your indoor air quality.

Furnace performance often indicates its condition. If you find problems or questionable signs, contact Powers Heating & Air, providing HVAC services for Peachtree City homeowners.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in Peachtree City, Georgia and surrounding areas about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 770-487-2040. 

Heating Options: Furnace or Boiler

Heating Options: Furnace or BoilerThe differences between forced-air furnaces and boilers, or radiant heating, are numerous. As far as heating options for your home go, Peachtree City is on the southern edge of places where both are viable choices. Which you choose depends on the type of heat you like and your physical preferences.

Comfort Comparisons

Radiant heating is slow and steady, while forced-air furnaces, including heat pumps, warm your air quickly and cool off just as fast. Eventually, a home with forced-air will warm to the point where temperatures are warm all over, but the furnace has to cycle on and off numerous times.

By comparison, a boiler runs continuously until the temperature reaches the thermostat’s settings. The heat radiates from wherever the pipes or tubes are that the boiler feeds. They can be in the floor beneath the carpet or tiles, snaked through baseboard heaters, or as radiators that sit in a room. Each room has a turn-off valve, so if you don’t want it heated, just turn off the heat.

If you don’t like a consistently warm home, radiant heating options may not be ideal for you. Occasionally, this region sees warm weather during the winter months and your home may feel too warm until it cools down. On the other hand, families with young children or aging family members often prefer warm floors and furniture.

Health Aspects of Radiant Heating

People who suffer from airborne allergies or asthma often prefer radiant heating options because they don’t move dust around like a forced-air furnace does. They’re also quieter since there is no fan inside the air handler or ductwork noise.

Lifetime Costs

Boilers cost more initially, but over their lifetimes, they’re actually less expensive to own and operate than forced-air systems. They’re more energy efficient, need less maintenance and break down less frequently. They’ll outlast furnaces by a decade or more.

There are good reasons to choose radiant heating options if you like enveloping warmth and forced-air if you don’t need that constant warmth. For more information, contact Powers Heating & Air, providing HVAC services for Peachtree City homeowners.

 

Our goal is to help educate our customers in Peachtree City, Georgia and surrounding areas about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 770-487-2040. 

What Does the Arrow on a Furnace Filter Indicate

What Does the Arrow on a Furnace Filter IndicateChanging the furnace filter can be confusing for those not familiar with how an HVAC system works. Sometimes these filters (which are the same ones for the air conditioner) are in hard-to-access places; sometimes they are easy to reach. What’s more, the many types of filters available can be confusing, as can the directions on the package: just what do those arrows mean, anyway? And what happens if you insert the filter the wrong way? Read on, and find the answers.

 

Changing the Air Filter

 

The filter in your HVAC system may go in the furnace cabinet, the ductwork or in the blower. If you don’t know where your filter is, ask your HVAC tech to show you during your annual HVAC maintenance visit. You can also get a demonstration on how to change the filter if you don’t know how. But if your filter is easy to access and you have no physical challenges that might prevent you from changing it, you may want to change the filter yourself.

 

But first, let’s talk about what kind of filter to buy. Make sure the filter is the right size. Never try to cram the wrong size filter into the slot; never try to trim it down. And when you insert it, make sure the arrows are pointed toward the furnace. and away from the return duct. It won’t destroy your HVAC system if you insert the filter the wrong way one time or so, but it could damage your system if you continuously put a filter in the the wrong direction.

 

How Often Should You Change a Filter?

 

Follow directions on the packaging for changing the filter. If you use a cheap fiberglass filter, change it every month. If you use a better quality pleated filter, change it every two to three months. If you have pets that shed or high traffic in your home, you should change it every two months.

 

If the filter ever gets wet for any reason, change to a dry one.

 

For more about the furnace filter, contact Powers Heating and Air of Peachtree City.

 

Avoid Using Furnace Rooms as Multi-Purpose Storage Areas

Avoid Using Furnace Rooms as Multi-Purpose Storage AreasFire safety is always at the top of every homeowner’s list no matter what time of year it is. But, given the fact that we’re heading into the colder months of the year, we thought it would be fitting to discuss the dangers of storage in mechanical room areas, such as the room where your furnace resides.

 

The Need for Additional Storage

 

If you’re like most people, you own many items that require storage throughout the year. Perhaps you have a collection of family mementos that you want to hold on to or maybe you have boxes full of Christmas ornaments and decorations. Point is, you have more than enough stuff and are always looking for the best place to store your belongings.

 

Why You Should Never Use a Furnace Room for Storage

 

While many homes have multiple places where you can store various items, your furnace room should never be one of these places. Personal belongings often include items that are either flammable or susceptible to fire. Some have even been known to house dangerous elements like solvents and cleaning supplies. If your furnace malfunctions or an accident occurs, a fire could erupt very quickly. This is why you should never use a furnace room for storage, no matter the situation.

 

How to Prevent a Fire in the Furnace Room

Keeping your family and friends safe from the dangers of a fire in the furnace room can be accomplished by following these tips:

  • Schedule an annual maintenance inspection of the furnace with a qualified technician.
  • Do not store any cardboard boxes, cleaning materials, or chemicals anywhere in the room.
  • Install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Purchase at least one fire extinguisher and make it easy to locate.
  • Do not block the entrance to the room or the areas surrounding the furnace.

To learn more about the dangers of storage in mechanical room areas, or if you have other home comfort concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact the friendly professionals at Powers Heating & Air. We’ve been serving the HVAC needs of Peachtree City and the surrounding areas since 2001.

 

Our goal is to help educate our customers in Peachtree City, Georgia and surrounding areas about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 770-487-2040.

4 HVAC Parts Every Homeowner Should Be Aware Of

4 HVAC Parts Every Homeowner Should Be Aware OfWhile HVAC parts are individual components, they’re also integral elements engineered to function together in a system that generates reliable, efficient cooling and heating. A shortfall or defect in a single part may affect operation and performance of the whole system. While a working knowledge of the complete HVAC parts inventory definitely isn’t necessary for the average homeowner, here are four major components to be aware of:

Air Conditioner Compressor

Located in the outside half of the system, the compressor incorporates a powerful high-voltage motor and compresses refrigerant flow to efficiently disperse heat. Compressors are typically designed to last the life of the system. Due to the high cost, replacing a damaged or defective compressor may not be financially viable in an older unit. Upgrading to a new air conditioner may be the better option.

Furnace Heat Exchanger

The heat exchanger component separates the furnace burner combustion chamber from the system airflow. In addition to transferring heat to warm the airflow, the heat exchanger prevents dangerous combustion byproducts including carbon monoxide from infiltrating into the airflow. For safety reasons, a furnace with a cracked or corroded heat exchanger must be shut down until the unit is properly repaired or replaced.

A/C Coils

An air conditioner is primarily a heat-mover. Household heat is absorbed by refrigerant circulating through the evaporator coil located in the indoor air handler. Warm refrigerant then flows to the outside unit where it is compressed and absorbed heat is dispersed into outdoor air by the condenser coil. For maximum heat transfer efficiency, both A/C coils should be kept clean with regular annual preventive maintenance by a qualified HVAC service technician.

Ductwork

The network of ducts distributes cooling and heating throughout the house. Most if it is installed out of sight inside walls or up in the attic. Leakage in residential ductwork is common and may severely reduce system performance and efficiency. With an inspection and leakage test, your HVAC contractor can quantify the extent of leakage and suggest sealing options.

For preventive maintenance or professional repair of HVAC parts, contact the experts at Powers Heating & Air.

 

Our goal is to help educate our customers in Peachtree City, Georgia and surrounding areas about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 770-487-2040.